Tongue Twister of the Day: The Critter Twitter Trap

John Mangan, a friendly humanitarian, Vermonter, and self-declared “lazy engineer looking for creative solutions to do less work,” was battling a tiny home infestation and the ethical conundrum that such an infestation brings. For many, pests are always to be dealt with by extermination, but instead of going the traditional deadly route, Mangan wanted to find a more humane solution. A Maker at heart, he decided to buy Havahart cages and build his own connected IoT traps for the critters using Temboo.

“Havahart traps are really nice if you have pests to rid your home of but you don’t feel the need to do this through means of killing the animal,” Mangan explained.

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These caring control cages trap the animal alive, allowing you to release it into the wild; however, it wasn’t long before Mangan started to notice a troubling pattern:

The problem we are faced with is constant monitoring of the trap. If you forget to check back frequently, usually at least once a day, you risk having the animal die in the cage simply due to shock or anxiety. As a result, you end up being more cruel to the animal than if you had just put it out of its misery to begin with. It is this problem that spawned my “Critter Twitter Trap.” The goal is to be notified as soon as the trap is “sprung”—thus, we know when to check it.

Using an Arduino Yún, a tilt switch, and Temboo’s Twitter Choreos, Mangan was able to build a trap that will send him an alert whenever it is triggered, and he has written up an excellent tutorial for anyone looking to recreate what he calls “a simple modification to a common pest trap.” The Choreos allow him to send a Twitter message whenever the trap has been sprung—check out what happens on his Critter Trap Twitter account.

“Most of these posts were tests, but a few were live catches!”

The text of the messages is generated from Team Fortress 2, a video game, allowing each message to be unique. Mangan also receives a text message if anything new is caught.

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We love seeing an IoT spin put on traditional devices, so if you have any creative projects of your own, reach out to us at hey@temboo.com. You might be our next featured story!

EAT And Temboo

EAT is a food supplier that specializes in “fresh and uncomplicated” sandwiches, soups, pies, and salads; every day, it distributes its freshly prepared breakfast and lunch foods to over a hundred locations throughout the U.K. One of EAT’s primary concerns is optimizing its use of data to control quality and ensure loss prevention—the short shelf life of its products and its commitment to freshness, makes precision in production absolutely essential.

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The data needed to make sure that everything gets to where it needs to be when it needs to be there, however, is not as straightforward to gather as one might think—warehouse supply levels, store locations, employee schedules, sales patterns, and even weather reports must be considered when planning an efficient strategy. These data points come from different sources and in different formats, creating discrepancies which can cause shortages or waste.

EAT’s IT department wanted a better way to cope with this disparate data. Their tracking system consisted of spreadsheets and hit-or-miss attempts with fickle FTP services, but these solutions only notified them when there was issue; they failed to provided specifics or ways to fix the problem. Rene Batsford, the head of IT at EAT, shared his reason for turning to Temboo: “We needed something with intelligence built into it. Temboo gave more feedback, and did something with that feedback.”

Temboo was the solution that could interact with the different data sources and EAT’s servers. Every night, a scheduled Temboo Choreo kicks off for EAT, retrieving several large files that contain various data. The Choreo then transforms the fairly complex XML files to a simpler XML schema and inserts all of this aggregated information into EAT’s SQL server database.

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Since Temboo is external to EAT’s systems, there is no risk of causing a domino effect of data failures if any of the individual data bridges malfunctions. Instead, the Choreos will communicate information about the failure even if EAT’s internal systems are offline—they include extensive error handling that can alert people if something goes wrong, or retry an insertion if connectivity to a service fails. “Temboo is a prime example of where [cloud computing] really works,” Batsford said. “By having Temboo external to our network, it actually gives us a lot more information. Temboo is a perfect fit not just for us but for lots of other companies similar to us out there.”

GeeksGiving: A Love Story

Once a year, we’re rewarded for completing yet another lap around the sun with an extravaganza of cake, candles, presents, and party hats. To this list, the advent of social media has added another birthday tradition: a spike in posts on our Facebook walls. Gerardo Ruiz-Dana, a developer, maker, and romantic from Guadalajara, Mexico, saw this as an opportunity to do something extra-special for his wife’s birthday. He set out to build the ultimate birthday present—a “Birthday Chocolate Machine”—to bring these virtual well-wishes into the material world and sweep her off her feet. His plan?

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Gerardo wanted to build a machine that would dispense a piece of chocolate every time someone posted a birthday message on his wife’s Facebook wall. He knew he needed to connect Facebook’s API to some sort of device that could release the chocolates, and, being a self-declared maker of “amazing moments,” he decided to begin with Temboo and an Arduino Yún. However, he soon realized he’d be patching a bunch of disparate steps together to bring his elaborate idea to fruition. No single Choreo retrieved and parsed all of the information he needed, so he turned to Twyla, our personalized Choreo-building platform. With the help of Aaron, one of our Twyla experts, Gerardo was able to design a new, customized Choreo for the occasion.

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The image above shows the Choreo as they designed it; you can see how all of the different steps work together to retrieve the appropriate comments from the Facebook wall. And it doesn’t only work for Facebook and chocolates—Gerardo has used the Choreo as more than just a creative present since its successful first run. For example, to build buzz for Startup Weekend Guadalajara, he used the Choreo to add some air to a balloon every time someone tweeted about the event. The tweet that popped the balloon received free tickets to attend! Both the chocolate dispenser and the balloon were a great success; you can watch a demo of the Chocolate Choreo Magic in action here:

Make sure to reach out to us at hey@temboo.com if you have any cool projects you’re working on. You may be our next featured project!

DIY Fitness Dashboard for the Quantified Self

At heart, DIYers are non-conformists. We scan the shelves at stores and see many choices that sort-of, almost, kinda nail what we were going for. But being slightly dissatisfied is never an afterthought—we take matters into our own hands and build the missing link: a better, cooler, customized version that does exactly what we need it to do.

In spirit of Father’s Day, we are featuring a DIY project built by Michael Woolfenden, a rising senior at Penn State, for his dad, who needed a better way to track his activity and fitness levels. It’s the ultimate fitness dashboard that integrates data from various self-tracking devices and centralizes the information in one easily accessible place. Michael took some time to tell us about the project, and the motivations behind it:

My dad has been a “gadget nut” for as long as I can remember. His latest fascination is with his own activity and fitness tracking and gadgets that can help him do it better. When I started to overhear him talk about how limited the sharing of the data captured by each device is and how some vendors would share—via pre-built interfaces—with other vendors but not all were openly sharing with each other, I became inspired to help him use multiple activity, weight, and blood pressure tracking devices from multiple vendors to track his activity and fitness better.

The challenge here is that my dad did not want to use only tracking devices from a single vendor; he wanted to use devices that were of lower cost and more specialized to his needs than generic trackers provided by the dashboard vendor.

Michael was able to build his own centralized dashboard with an Arduino Yún and Temboo’s Choreo-building tool, Twyla. He designed a customized Choreo to link together the various data sources that he was reading from such as Runkeeper, Fitbit, and the Human API, and then store the information he gathered in his dashboard; that way, he was able to run the whole process through his Yún. Michael explained:

I am not a developer, so to keep things simple, I chose to develop my project using Arduino Yún hardware, its supporting Sketch language IDE, and the Temboo Twyla builder tool, which was used to orchestrate the HTTP requests and Choreos together into a master Choreo that is executed by the Arduino Yún to perform all of the data sharing on a daily basis.

The result is that, on a daily basis, Michael’s dad is able to check all of his vitals, aggregated and organized for a clear view of his progress. Thanks to this integration, he no longer needs to dig through all of his different fitness apps to make sense of the data his devices throw at him; he can simply check one place, once a day, and understand his fitness progress—seamlessly.

Michael closed with some advice for non-developers like him who are giving programming a try for themselves:

I did run into a few minor roadblocks and learning curve issues with both the Temboo platform/Twyla IDE and the Arduino Yún, its IDE, and its Sketch language. It turned out that every one of my challenges could be overcome with a little help from Temboo support.

If you are building anything cool with Temboo, reach out to us with details at hey@temboo.com and you could be our next feature!

Temboo Likes This

One of the unofficial requirements for working at Temboo is that you have to be a fan of 3D printing. This isn’t particularly imageonerous, of course, because 3D printing is very cool, and most people who have seen a 3D printer in action walk away impressed. The technology has applications ranging from surgery to space exploration, and, as it turns out, it comes in handy for building cool Temboo projects as well! Manuel Orduño, a hardware specialist from Hermosillo, Mexico, combined Temboo and 3D printing to make his Like Lamp, which was a big hit around our office.

Manuel was participating in a local Arduino Day event, and wanted to find an interesting way to show what can be done with Temboo and an Arduino Yún. He also wanted to bring some attention to D’Sun Labs, a group working to promote physical computing in his area (we’ve encountered Mexico’s growing tech scene before!). To accomplish both tasks at once, Manuel created a lamp that would light up every time someone liked the D’Sun Labs Facebook page. He used Temboo’s Facebook>Reading>GetObject Choreo to track the total number of likes on the page, and then programmed his Yún to blink a set of blue LEDs for each new like that came in.

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Photo credit: Víctor Aranda

There are two elements of Manuel’s lamp that we particularly liked. The first, of course, is that he chose to enclose the LED string in a custom-printed 3D Facebook “like” icon. It looks great, it drives home the point of the device, and it’s a cool integration of 3D printing and Temboo. The second is that, in his own words,

I had never worked with the web before, so terms like OAuth, APIs, tokens, etc., were totally unfamiliar to me. But the Temboo service simplified this A LOT—I think I would not have managed to make it in time without it.

We’re always trying to make it easier for hardware developers to tap the power of the cloud and for software developers to get their hands messy with physical devices, so that’s exactly the sort of thing we want to hear. Or, if you will, that’s exactly the sort of thing Temboo likes!

Flip the Switch and Get Going

Now you can connect even more Arduinos with the power of Temboo by simply flipping our IoT Mode on. This new feature opens up a whole new world of possibilities for the Internet of Things.

What is IoT mode, you ask?

It’s a new way to access our 2,000+ Choreos on any of your Arduino or Arduino-compatible boards. By just hitting a switch at the top right of any Choreo page, you “got the power” to call that Choreo with a sketch tailored specifically for the device you pick from our drop down menu. Previously, this feature was only available for the Yún, but now it is open to the larger Arduino family. All you have to do is select the type of shield your board uses and the code will generate accordingly.

So how do I begin using this amazing IoT feature?

Select a Choreo from our vast Library and turn on IoT Mode. In the example below, we chose the Data.gov API and the GetCensusIdByCoordinates Choreo. Data.gov is a cool way to access APIs from a number of US governmet agencies and to query government datasets, including the US Census!

The “Arduino” option encompasses compatible boards that lack the Yún’s built-in wifi capabilities, but can connect to the internet with a shield. Fill out your shield’s specifics when the popup appears and save for future use. Run your Choreo and scroll down to retrieve the code for the sketch, ready to be pasted into your Arduino IDE. You can even plug this into a sketch generated by our nifty Device Coder to start mixing and matching!

We are thrilled just thinking of all of the possibilities this unlocks for the Internet of Things. We want to hear all about what you cook up with this new capability, so if you are working on an interesting project, reach out to us at hey@temboo.com!

Automated Life Decisions: Lunch Edition

Everyday, lunch time inevitably hits the clock and we’re faced with deciding where to go for food. It’s 2014, and that means we are granted the luxury of choices in plenitude. As we try to balance this mundane task with work stress and actually important decisions, luxury morphs into a curse. Having too many options can be overwhelming—even science agrees. No one wants to miss out on trying new foods and great restaurants, but lunch is not something you should sweat.

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Ryan Lane, a Senior User Experience Developer at Wire Stone in Seattle, waved goodbye to the so-called noon dilemma after discovering Temboo. Thanks to our Foursquare Choreos, he rid himself from the aforementioned headaches with an “automated life choice” machine that prints out a receipt with the name of a restaurant, the rating, and the address, telling him where to eat everyday. This little piece of paper includes all of the details necessary for him to scarf down a delicious meal.

For his project, Lane used an Arduino Yún, a tactile mobile switch, a cardboard box, and a thermal printer from Adafruit. “Since so much of what I make is digital, it’s nice to have some tangible things every now and then,” Lane said. “Once I started putting them together I came across the Temboo service and was very impressed with all of the capabilities of the service… I started digging around with the Foursquare libraries that are part of Temboo and discovered that it had everything I needed to get a list of local places.”

Lane used our Arduino library and the Adafruit Thermal printer library, as well as the Foursquare Explore Venue Choreo. What was most impressive for Lane, a first-time Temboo user, was “how quickly it took to go from parts, idea, to functional box. All in all it took maybe 3 hours. Most of that was just playing around, too.”

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Lane is “thinking about adding a GPS so that way [the box] can dynamically assign the location and suggest locations from wherever the box is.”

Our users tackle a range of mundane and high-profile obstacles through their projects. If you’re working on anything awesome, shoot us an email to hey@temboo.com, and you may be our next featured project!

Las Aventuras De Tim Y Aaron en Guadalajara

Tim and Aaron, Temboo’s Technical and Design leads, found themselves in Guadalajara, Mexico, this past week as two of the official coaches for the Internet Of Everything vertical at Startup Weekend Mega. This is an annual event for people to develop ideas for startups and build an all-inclusive business model in the span of a weekend; as the word "Mega" implies, the one in Guadalajara is the world’s largest. We’ve briefly summarized the happenings here, but their adventures are far too interesting to reside in a tiny paragraph. This is a tale of combat, surprise, and immense creativity.

But first things first. Upon his return, Tim couldn’t stop raging about the superiority of Mexican Fritos, and Aaron agreed their lemony spice elevates them to a whole new level in the junk food pyramid. Thankfully, Tim brought back a large bag of the goods, and we concurred with their judgment! The heavenly Fritos were not the only pleasant surprise Tim and Aaron encountered in Mexico; from the minute our heroes arrived on Thursday night, their stay was jampacked with action.


Upon arrival, Tim and Aaron went straight from the airport to the Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, where they presented our Twitter Choreos using both our site’s interface and Eclipse. They then used Nexmo Choreos to call members of the audience and have them turn on the LED’s on an Arduino Yún from their phones. The Temboo magic show was a big hit, especially after the audience got involved!


The next morning, Tim and Aaron visited HackerGarage, a cool space for Makers in Guadalajara that hosts workshops and tech events and provides tools for Makers. They were honored to be greeted by Hackeroso, HackerGarage’s “el perro guardian,” a guard dog who even has his own twitter. At HackerGarage, they coached a “Bootcamp” session where they introduced Startup Weekend competitors to Temboo, arming them for combat with our Choreos. After that, they returned to ITESO for opening ceremonies, where videographer drones patrolled the air and everyone engaged in a giant “Rock, Paper, Scissors” icebreaker battle.


After opening ceremonies, the participants split up into their verticals; there were over 100 contestants in the IoT vertical, which was a hot draw for attendees (Tim and Aaron would like attribute this to their own celebrity, but we have no way of confirming this). Within their verticals, aspiring entrepreneurs shared their ideas for startups, and everyone voted on their favorites. Out of over fifty pitches, eleven final projects were chosen by sticky note ballot, and teams of five to ten competitors formed to start working on each. The teams got busy working, and some even continued all night!

Saturday, Tim and Aaron spent all day helping the participants build with Temboo, working with projects that ranged from surveillance and agricultural irrigation to pet social media.


On Sunday, they helped contestants with last minute questions before they presented their prototypes to the judges. Winning projects ranged from Ecoville, the irrigation project that used Temboo, to a laser tag system called Cryonix.

The weekend ended with an afterparty in Chapultepec, where Tim and Aaron were happy to see another one of the Temboo projects, “Check In Shot,” fully functional and dispensing free shots to people who checked in on FourSquare.

Temboo Ignited with a Spark

Today we have a guest post from Karl Kaiser; check out his blog to read more about his work with IoT:

I am working with connected devices and was looking for a cloud service. While surveying the field Temboo caught my eye because of the large number of supported premium web sites and the promise to connect IoT devices to the Internet in a breeze.

imageThe connected device I am using is a Spark Core. The Spark Core is a sleek, small board that offers a powerful 32 bit ARM CPU paired with WiFi. The product grew out of a Kickstarter campaign and is rapidly gaining in popularity. The Spark is nicely priced and everything is open source. The team supporting the Spark Core is smart and supportive and made a great choice to port most of the main Arduino APIs to their platform. As outlined in a blog post here, migrating Arduino Libraries to the Spark Core often turns out to be pretty easy.

With Temboo providing an open source library for Arduino, I was tempted to give it a try. However, I had no Temboo-Arduino setup so I was not sure how hard it would be to get it all up and running.

Well, I am happy to report that it was easier than expected. Temboo’s code is well written. I only had to work around some AVR-specific optimizations that Temboo did to save program memory. As the Spark Core is built around a STM32-103F chip, resources are not as tight as with the AVR, so I simply bypassed these optimizations.

Here are some brief instructions for how to install the Temboo Arduino Library. The instructions use the Spark command line SDK setup.

1. Download the modified Temboo Arduino Library source code from GitHub:

mkdir temboo 
cd temboo
git clone http://github.com/Bentuino/temboo.git

2. Get the Spark Core firmware:

git clone https://github.com/spark/core-firmware.git
git clone https://github.com/spark/core-common-lib.git
git clone https://github.com/spark/core-communication-lib.git

// Merge the two source codes
cp -fr core-* temboo
rm core-*

3. In older Spark firmware there is a small problem that the Spark team already fixed. Open the file core-firmware/inc/spark_wiring_ipaddress.h and uncomment line 54 with your favorite editor:

// Overloaded cast operator to allow IPAddress objects to be used 
// where a pointer to a four-byte uint8_t array is expected
// operator uint32_t() { return *((uint32_t*)_address); };

bool operator==(const IPAddress& addr) { return (*((uint32_t*)_address))
== (*((uint32_t*)addr._address)); };
bool operator==(const uint8_t* addr);

4. Save the TembooAccount.h file you generated with Device Coder to temboo-arduino-library-1.2\Temboo

5. Now it is time to build the Spark application

cd temboo/temboo/core-firmware/build
make -f makefile.temboo clean all

6. Connect your Spark Core to your computer via a USB cable

7. Push both buttons, release the Reset button and continue holding the other button until RGB-LED lights up yellow

8. Download application into Spark Core

make -f makefile.temboo program-dfu

Temboo Examples

Two simple Spark application examples are included:

  • core-firmware/src/application_gxls.cpp - Example demonstrates the Temboo library with Google Spreadsheet
  • core-firmware/src/application_gmail.cpp - Example demonstrates the Temboo library with Gmail

To change the example that is built, edit the first line in the core-firmware/src/build.mk file:

CPPSRC += $(TARGET_SRC_PATH)/application_gxls.cpp

or:

CPPSRC += $(TARGET_SRC_PATH)/application_gmail.cpp

Building this code was tested under Windows 8.1 using cygwin and the MINGW version of the ARM GCC compiler tool chain. It should be easy to use this Temboo Library with the Spark Cloud-based SDK. To configure the Library to support Spark all that is required is to define the following label:

CFLAGS += -DSPARK_PRODUCT_ID=$(SPARK_PRODUCT_ID)

or add a

#define SPARK_PRODUCT_ID SPARK_PRODUCT_ID

to the source code.

Temboo support for the Spark Core is a lot of fun. It is easy to set up your own Temboo account and compile the Temboo Arduino Library that now supports the Spark Core platform. To learn more about similar projects please visit my blog at http://bentuino.com.

If you are interested in being a guest blogger for Temboo, don’t hesitate to reach out to us at hey@temboo.com!

Temboo on the Pitch

Earlier this year, Temboo partnered with Nexmo to find the best application that used one of the Temboo Library’s Nexmo Choreos.  The contest’s results are in, and from a pool of very interesting and creative submissions, John Grant’s Teamalert stood out as the one most deserving of the prize.  John recently took some time to tell us about his app and why he decided to create it.

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A communications worker from Edinburgh, Scotland, John decided to combine two of his hobbies—programming and rugby—by creating Teamalert.  His goal, as he puts it, was “to try and ease the pain of managing a sports team.”  The task of organizing the “fairly small” group of seventy registered players in his club was so complicated and involved that he decided to find an easier way to track the availability of and commitments from each of his teammates.  John chose to use Temboo and Nexmo to automate the contact process, which up until that point had tended to involve hundreds of phone calls and texts every week.

The app allows players to register online with their phone numbers, and then allows the team manager to see the list of registered players and decide whom to call.  Thanks to Temboo’s Nexmo CaptureTextToSpeechPrompt Choreo, the manager can enter a custom message with information about the match time and place, and prompt players to use the keypad to respond.  The Choreo collects the keypad responses and logs them on the website, allowing the manager to easily identify who will be available on the given day and to select the team accordingly.

Teamalert is a simple solution to a headache-inducing problem, and according to John, it’s only going to get better: he’s working on streamlining a number of team management processes with the app, and is planning to add more Temboo Choreos to his program to do things like collect club subscriptions from players.  You can follow his team, Lismore RFC, here, and if you’re in Edinburgh and looking to play some rugby, sign up.  John says they’re always happy to welcome new players!

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Our DevOps Director On Camera With Puppet Labs!

Read about what our Director of DevOps, Jeffrey Froman, learned about Puppet Enterprise while securing against Heartbleed in his guest post on the Puppet Labs blog!

¡Viva La Temboo!

This past weekend, Temboo went international! We flew down to Guadalajara, Mexico, to be part of Startup Weekend Mega, where Western Mexico’s vibrant tech scene was on full display. As mentors for teams in the Internet of Everything portion of the event, we were thrilled to watch all of the creativity that went into making the projects (but more on that later). For now, here’s a Kodak moment of the teams, post-battle of the devs.

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We had a lot of fun last weekend at Maker Faire Bay Area! Next up is O’Reilly Solid starting tomorrow—come find us and say “hello” if you’re there! We had a lot of fun last weekend at Maker Faire Bay Area! Next up is O’Reilly Solid starting tomorrow—come find us and say “hello” if you’re there! We had a lot of fun last weekend at Maker Faire Bay Area! Next up is O’Reilly Solid starting tomorrow—come find us and say “hello” if you’re there! We had a lot of fun last weekend at Maker Faire Bay Area! Next up is O’Reilly Solid starting tomorrow—come find us and say “hello” if you’re there! We had a lot of fun last weekend at Maker Faire Bay Area! Next up is O’Reilly Solid starting tomorrow—come find us and say “hello” if you’re there!

We had a lot of fun last weekend at Maker Faire Bay Area! Next up is O’Reilly Solid starting tomorrow—come find us and say “hello” if you’re there!

240 Kilometers of Temboo


Every April, more than one thousand men and women of all ages assemble in the Moroccan Sahara to run an ultramarathon—a six day race over approximately 240 km (150 miles) of uninhabited desert. The race, called Marathon des Sables, is an endurance test that requires runners to cross inhospitable terrain beneath the heat of the equally inhospitable sun, carrying all their food and gear with them for the entire trek. This year, one runner, Ande Gregson of the UK, decided to take Temboo with him as well.

Ande wanted a way to update his son on his daily progress, and decided to get creative. He built a dial with an Arduino Yún that would point to one of five statuses—eating, cooking, walking, running, or sleeping—depending on what he was doing. To control the dial in Britain from the Sahara, he turned to Temboo and Twitter. Ande brought a small Nokia phone with him during the race, and used it to tweet whenever he had a good enough signal. He had Temboo’s Twitter Choreos set up to read his tweets, and then move the dial back home based on certain keywords that he tweeted. He also hooked a small screen up to his Yún to display his tweets as they came in.

Congratulations to Ande for finishing the race, and for developing the most extreme application of Temboo we’ve seen yet! We’ll be checking back next April to see if Ande and Temboo will be returning to Morocco for another run through the desert.

Reimagining Beekeeping with a Data-Driven Twist

When we say that Temboo is a tool for building the Internet of Everything, we really mean everything—we’ve seen members of the Temboo community connect all sorts of sensors, noisemakers, lights, apps, and services to one another to create something new using our library.  Now, thanks to the work being done by a student group at Yale University, we can add a few thousand bees to our list of Temboo-connected objects.  Yale Bee Space is a group of undergraduate apiarists who are designing smart beehives that they think will fundamentally change the way that bees are kept, and maybe avert ecological disaster in the process.

Glen Meyerowitz, one of the founders of the group, explained to us that honeybee populations in the United States have been collapsing without explanation, and that although a number of theories exist regarding why this might be happening, there is very little data available to shed light on the problem.  Since bees play a major role in pollinating plants, collapsing colonies are causing environmental problems that go beyond just honey shortages.  Enter Glen and the other members of Yale Bee Space, who decided to update the 19th century hive models that are still used by most beekeepers by installing solar-powered sound, humidity, temperature, and weight sensors in them.  Their hope is that by collecting and analyzing data from numerous connected hives, they might be able to identify the sources of the colony collapse problem.

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The hives, which were designed and built by the members of the group, use Arduino Pro Minis and Xbee units to gather data from the sensors and transmit the information to a coordinating unit that is hooked up to an Arduino Yún.  The data is then compiled in a spreadsheet using Temboo’s Google Spreadsheets Choreos.  Early returns have been promising, and the group is looking forward to expanding their operation with more hives and more data.  Take a deeper look at what they’re doing on their website, and if you’re interested, get in touch!  They’d love to connect with anyone who wants to learn more or work with them on the project.  We at Temboo certainly found their work to be fascinating, and are glad to be a part of it!

If you’re making something similarly cool with Temboo, let us know by emailing us at hey@temboo.com.  We always love to hear about innovative projects like Yale Bee Space’s that put Temboo to good use!

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